Graduate Research Symposium 2009

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!style="background:#efefef;"| 12:00-1:30 ||  ||  Lunch - Sandwiches and Salad
 
!style="background:#efefef;"| 12:00-1:30 ||  ||  Lunch - Sandwiches and Salad
 
|-  
 
|-  
| 1:30-2:00  || Roland de Gouvenain || Keynote Address
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| 1:30-2:00  || Roland de Gouvenain || Keynote Address: Population ecology and life history traits of ''Cupressus forbesii'': human influences from changes in fire regime
 
|-  
 
|-  
 
| 2:00-2:15  || Tobias Landberg ||  Experimental manipulation of maternal investment in sister salamander
 
| 2:00-2:15  || Tobias Landberg ||  Experimental manipulation of maternal investment in sister salamander
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The '''EEB Graduate Student Symposium''' is an all day event where graduate students present their research to other graduate students and faculty. Any EEB graduate student can present: BSMS, masters, PhD, old and new students. New graduate students usually present research ideas or preliminary data, while those more ‘seasoned’ students present their most recent results, often in preparation for upcoming spring and summer meetings.  
 
The '''EEB Graduate Student Symposium''' is an all day event where graduate students present their research to other graduate students and faculty. Any EEB graduate student can present: BSMS, masters, PhD, old and new students. New graduate students usually present research ideas or preliminary data, while those more ‘seasoned’ students present their most recent results, often in preparation for upcoming spring and summer meetings.  
 
<br>
 
<br>
<br>
 
We would like to invite all EEB graduate students to give a 15min talk. Speed Talks have been seen at several large meetings over the last year (playing off the speed dating idea). These talks will be 3min presentation, PowerPoint optional. They are ideal for sharing side projects, amazing images or videos, great opportunities that others should take advantage of, or any other interesting things that you would like to share. Since this is new, we are going to have one small section of them in the afternoon. We envision these being given in addition to a regular 15min talk.
 
  
<center>'''15min Talk Title Submission Deadline: TBA '''</center>
 
<br><center>'''Abstract Submission Deadline: Self-Submitted on EEBedia after the schedule is posted'''</center>
 
<br>
 
 
<center>[[Image:picheader1.gif]]</center>
 
<center>[[Image:picheader1.gif]]</center>
 
__NOEDITSECTION__
 
__NOEDITSECTION__
 
==Abstracts==
 
==Abstracts==
<span id="NAME">'''NAME'''</span>
+
<span id="NAME">'''Laura Cisneros'''</span>
 
<br>
 
<br>
 +
Comparison of tropical metacommunities along an extensive elevational gradient <br>
 
Insert Abstract Here...<br>
 
Insert Abstract Here...<br>
 +
 +
<span id="NAME">'''Vanessa Boukili'''</span>
 +
<br>
 +
Plant functional traits and patterns of community assembly during natural rain forest regeneration <br>
 +
Insert Abstract Here...<br>
 +
 +
<span id="NAME">'''Frank Smith'''</span>
 +
<br>
 +
The Genetic Loci of Evolutionary Change of Tribolium Beetle Antennal Morphology  <br>
 +
Insert Abstract Here...<br>
 +
 +
<span id="NAME">'''Kerri Mocko'''</span>
 +
<br>
 +
In the South African veld: solar tracking and temperatures in contrasting leaf shapes of Pelargonium <br>
 +
Insert Abstract Here...<br>
 +
 +
<span id="NAME">''' Name here...'''</span>
 +
<br>
 +
Title <br>
 +
Insert Abstract Here...<br>
 +
 +
 
<span id="NAME">'''Karolina Fučíková'''</span>
 
<span id="NAME">'''Karolina Fučíková'''</span>
 
<br>
 
<br>
 
What ''Bracteacoccus'' is not. <br>
 
What ''Bracteacoccus'' is not. <br>
 
Traditionally, the classification of coccoid green algae depended on subtle morphological differences, without much information about the potential variation or plasticity of these traits. The use of molecular sequence data provides a high number of characters that are not subject to phenotypic plasticity and therefore are assumed to provide a more direct measure of phylogenetic relationships. Molecular phylogenetic studies of coccoids often yield unexpected results, uncovering cryptic diversity as well as placing taxa in dramatically different positions from those expected under the morphological paradigm. As part of a monographic study of the chlorophycean genus ''Bracteacoccus'', several strains deposited in culture collections under this generic name were found to belong to other green algal genera. Although morphologically similar to young cells of ''Bracteacoccus'', these algae were demonstrated to belong to the genera ''Myrmecia'' and ''Pseudomuriella'' based on 18S and <i>rbc</i>L sequence data. These cases may represent two of potentially many discrepancies of morphological and sequence data.  
 
Traditionally, the classification of coccoid green algae depended on subtle morphological differences, without much information about the potential variation or plasticity of these traits. The use of molecular sequence data provides a high number of characters that are not subject to phenotypic plasticity and therefore are assumed to provide a more direct measure of phylogenetic relationships. Molecular phylogenetic studies of coccoids often yield unexpected results, uncovering cryptic diversity as well as placing taxa in dramatically different positions from those expected under the morphological paradigm. As part of a monographic study of the chlorophycean genus ''Bracteacoccus'', several strains deposited in culture collections under this generic name were found to belong to other green algal genera. Although morphologically similar to young cells of ''Bracteacoccus'', these algae were demonstrated to belong to the genera ''Myrmecia'' and ''Pseudomuriella'' based on 18S and <i>rbc</i>L sequence data. These cases may represent two of potentially many discrepancies of morphological and sequence data.  
 +
 +
 +
<span id="NAME">'''Roland de Gouvenain'''</span>
 +
<br>
 +
Population ecology and life history traits of ''Cupressus forbesii'': human influences from changes in fire regime
 +
<br>
 +
We use the Tecate cypress (''Cupressus forebesii'' Jeps.), a fire-adapted short-lived tree species endemic to southern California and northern Baja, Mexico, as a model to examine whether more than a century of fire regime difference across the US-Mexico international border has selected for different reproductive life history traits, produced different population demographics, and generated different genetic variability among perennial plant populations. Our hypotheses are that Baja populations, being subjected to a more variable and fine grained fire regime, should exhibit multiple age classes, older tree age at maturity, facultative serotiny, and greater among-population genetic variability. California populations on the other hand, being subjected to a very narrow variation in mostly stand-replacement fire regime resulting from strict fire suppression management, should exhibit fewer age classes, younger tree age at maturity, obligate serotiny, and lower among-population genetic variability. Preliminary data indicate that Baja populations may exhibit multiple age classes including adults and young seedlings, even though no stand-replacement fire has occurred there in at least 35 years, a phenomenon not observed on the US side of the border.
  
 
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[[Category:Graduate Research Symposium]]
 
[[Category:Graduate Research Symposium]]
 
[[Category:Graduate Student Resources]]
 
[[Category:Graduate Student Resources]]

Revision as of 10:44, 16 March 2009

Saturday, March 21st 2009



Picheader1.gif

New Schedule

Time Speaker Title
8:30-9:00 Coffee & Tea (drinks only)
9:00-9:15 Dean Teitelbaum Welcome Address
9:15-9:30 Laura Cisneros Comparison of tropical metacommunities along an extensive

elevational gradient

9:30-9:45 Vanessa Boukili Plant functional traits and patterns of community assembly during natural rain forest regeneration
9:45-10:00 Frank Smith The Genetic Loci of Evolutionary Change of Tribolium Beetle Antennal

Morphology

10:00-10:15 Kerri Mocko In the South African veld: solar tracking and temperatures in contrasting leaf shapes of Pelargonium
10:15-10:30
10:30-11:00 Morning Break - Drinks and Fruit
11:00-11:15 Karolina Fucikova What Bracteacoccus is not
11:15-11:30 Lori Benoit Phylogenetic relationships and genetic diversity of the invasive aquatic angiosperm Hydrilla verticillata (l.f.) Royle (Hydrocharitaceae)
11:30-11:45
11:45-12:00 Nicholas Tippery But will it float? Evolution of inflorescence architecture in Nymphoides (Menyanthaceae)
12:00-1:30 Lunch - Sandwiches and Salad
1:30-2:00 Roland de Gouvenain Keynote Address: Population ecology and life history traits of Cupressus forbesii: human influences from changes in fire regime
2:00-2:15 Tobias Landberg Experimental manipulation of maternal investment in sister salamander

species

2:15-2:30
2:30-2:45
2:45-3:00 Speed Talks
2:45-2:50 Nicholas Tippery Top graduate student webpages of 2009
2:50-2:55
2:55-3:00
Picheader1.gif

The EEB Graduate Student Symposium is an all day event where graduate students present their research to other graduate students and faculty. Any EEB graduate student can present: BSMS, masters, PhD, old and new students. New graduate students usually present research ideas or preliminary data, while those more ‘seasoned’ students present their most recent results, often in preparation for upcoming spring and summer meetings.

Picheader1.gif

Abstracts

Laura Cisneros
Comparison of tropical metacommunities along an extensive elevational gradient
Insert Abstract Here...

Vanessa Boukili
Plant functional traits and patterns of community assembly during natural rain forest regeneration
Insert Abstract Here...

Frank Smith
The Genetic Loci of Evolutionary Change of Tribolium Beetle Antennal Morphology
Insert Abstract Here...

Kerri Mocko
In the South African veld: solar tracking and temperatures in contrasting leaf shapes of Pelargonium
Insert Abstract Here...

Name here...
Title
Insert Abstract Here...


Karolina Fučíková
What Bracteacoccus is not.
Traditionally, the classification of coccoid green algae depended on subtle morphological differences, without much information about the potential variation or plasticity of these traits. The use of molecular sequence data provides a high number of characters that are not subject to phenotypic plasticity and therefore are assumed to provide a more direct measure of phylogenetic relationships. Molecular phylogenetic studies of coccoids often yield unexpected results, uncovering cryptic diversity as well as placing taxa in dramatically different positions from those expected under the morphological paradigm. As part of a monographic study of the chlorophycean genus Bracteacoccus, several strains deposited in culture collections under this generic name were found to belong to other green algal genera. Although morphologically similar to young cells of Bracteacoccus, these algae were demonstrated to belong to the genera Myrmecia and Pseudomuriella based on 18S and rbcL sequence data. These cases may represent two of potentially many discrepancies of morphological and sequence data.


Roland de Gouvenain
Population ecology and life history traits of Cupressus forbesii: human influences from changes in fire regime
We use the Tecate cypress (Cupressus forebesii Jeps.), a fire-adapted short-lived tree species endemic to southern California and northern Baja, Mexico, as a model to examine whether more than a century of fire regime difference across the US-Mexico international border has selected for different reproductive life history traits, produced different population demographics, and generated different genetic variability among perennial plant populations. Our hypotheses are that Baja populations, being subjected to a more variable and fine grained fire regime, should exhibit multiple age classes, older tree age at maturity, facultative serotiny, and greater among-population genetic variability. California populations on the other hand, being subjected to a very narrow variation in mostly stand-replacement fire regime resulting from strict fire suppression management, should exhibit fewer age classes, younger tree age at maturity, obligate serotiny, and lower among-population genetic variability. Preliminary data indicate that Baja populations may exhibit multiple age classes including adults and young seedlings, even though no stand-replacement fire has occurred there in at least 35 years, a phenomenon not observed on the US side of the border.


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