EEB BS/MS graduates

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This page provides information on the positions that students from the BS/MS program have taken after finishing their degrees.

Kathryn Levasseur: Field co-director for the Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project

The [www.jbhawksbillproject.org Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project] seeks to better understand the life history of the hawksbill, a critically endangered sea turtle, in order to serve as a foundation for wise management and policy making. The project is a collaboration between WIDECAST (The Wider Caribbean Sea Turtle Conservation Network, a partner organization to the United Nations Caribbean Environment Programme) and the Jumby Bay Island Company (an association of homeowners on Long Island, Antigua).

The importance of a research project such as the JBHP lies with its intensive monitoring and documentation of nesting activity through saturation tagging. Hourly beach patrols are done every night for six months (June-November) to ensure every nesting hawksbill is identified and documented. This rigorous data collection has continued since the project's inception in 1987. As an endangered species with a long generation time, hawksbills require long-term, consistent data to understand their population dynamics. Two decades of monitoring on Jumby Bay have now begun to shown a clear increase in the population (Richardson et al. 2006). The project also promotes public awareness of sea turtles regionally and internationally through local school visits and educational turtle watches for local residents, tourists, and members of the environmental division in Antigua. As field co-director, I am in charge of community outreach in addition to hourly beach patrols and data collection: tagging, measuring, photographing, egg counts, carapace mapping, nest excavations, etc.

Richardson, J. I., D. B. Hall, P. A. Mason, K. M. Andrews, R. Bjorkland, Y. Cai & R. Bell (2006) Eighteen years of saturation tagging data reveal a significant increase in nesting hawksbill sea turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) on Long Island, Antigua. Animal Conservation 9: 302-307.


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